Category Archives: Mission

Padre Ignacio Tirsch circa 1762

The following is a quote from  this site. http://gardenhistorygirl.blogspot.com/2011/04/garden-history-images-of-week-mexican.html
“These images are so beautiful that they actually make me feel the pangs of nostalgia–for a Mexico I never saw and never will see.  Circa 1762, they are the work of Father Ignacio Tirsch,  Jesuit missionary to the Baja peninsula, who over the five years of his sojourn there created a portfolio of forty-eight drawings rich in garden history; recording both productive and decorative landscapes, as well as native flora.  The entire volume–architecture, costumes, flora and fauna–is a treasure of the Czech National Library, online at manuscriptorium (click on ‘facsimile’ to see the images).”

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San Jose del Cabo, by Father Ingacio Tirsch, Circa 1762

Title: TIRSCH, Ignác
Title: CODEX PICTORICUS MEXICANUS
http://v2.manuscriptorium.com/apps/main/en/index.php?request=request_document&docId=rep_remake81&mode=&client=

Antigua California by Harry W. Crosby

Antigua California: Mission and Colony on
the Peninsular Frontier, 1697-1768

51R9F1AVECL._SX362_BO1,204,203,200_by Harry W. Crosby
(University of Arizona Southwest Center Book)
Hardcover – May 1, 1994
The photo on the cover is a watercolor facsimile of the original art,  by  Joanne Haskell Crosby, depicting San Jose del Cabo, based on the original drawings of Padre Ignacio Tirsch.

First published in 1994 and now available again, this Spanish Borderlands classic recounts Jesuit colonization of the Old California, the peninsula now known as Baja California. Jesuit missionaries founded their first settlement in 1697 and unintentionally created a Hispanic society that outlived the missions and their Indian converts. The author brings to light Jesuit missionization and culture, European-Indian contacts, mission and presidio operations, family social life, the unique peninsular economy, and the Jesuit expulsion.

The following are quotes from customer comments on Amazon.com

“For a scholar, the book is eminently useful: full of maps, chronological tables of people and places, explanations of systems and bureaucracies. For the history buff, it is a dream of readability and detail.”

“A chemistry teacher turned archeologist, anthropologist and historical researcher, Crosby’s book is without question a serious scholarly work but reads as easily as a novel. ”

http://www.harrywcrosby.com/bookshelf_antigua.htm

Order this book from Amazon.com.
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0826314953/qid=1003562918/sr=2-1/ref=sr_2_15_1/002-2424968-0984048

San José del Cabo Añuiti

The original San José del Cabo Añuiti Mission Church was built in  April 8, 1730.

Best guess of writing: Ciclone 16 to 17 Sept 1918. This picture is from 1918, after a hurricane damaged Mission San Jose. Originally, the Mission had a single nave, without towers but almost disappeared after the hurricane that struck the area in 1918.

 


Founded near the southern end of the California peninsula, this was one mission that served one of the reasons for occupying California (to resupply the Manila Galleon on its long return to Acapulco from Asia).

The Pericú Revolt of 1734 destroyed the mission, and over its years, the mission moved locations at least 4 times between the beach and 5 miles inland.

The mission was closed in 1748, and for the next 20 years it was a visita (satellite mission station) of Santiago. It was returned to mission status with the arrival of the Franciscans who replaced the Jesuits after their forced removal.

No ruins remain today at any of the 4 sites, but the modern church in the town plaza is built on the final site.

Marquis Mcdonald identified two of the old mission sites during his excursion  during 1949-1950, but there was very little remaining to determine the size or shape. His book, Baja: Land of Lost Missions reports his findings.

Tile mosaic above the entrance doorway shows the murder of Father Tamaral in 1734.
Source: http://historum.com/american-history/83478-missionaries-baja-california-1697-1850-a-2.html

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Tile mosaic above entrance doorway shows the murder of Father Tamaral in 1734.

 

Drawing of San José del Cabo by Father Ignacio Tirsch, c.1792. Image from the Czech National Library.

Mision San Jose del Cabo Añuiti:

Established  in  1730  by Jesuits Father  Nicolas  Tamaral and  Jose  Echeverria, the first Mission building  was  established  close  to  the  Estero  (Rio  San  Jose),  soon  they  have  to  move  locations  do  to  a
mosquito infestation the new location was San Jose Viejo.
Constructions  at  that  time  were  simple  adobe  structures
with stick  and  palm  roofs and  do  to storm damage and Pericu Indians sacked and destroying the buildings the Missionaries had to move the mission location on several times. Father Tamaral rebuilt the Mission on the Santa Rosa area.

In 1734  Father  Tamaral  pronounced  against  polygamy,  this  pronouncement  caused  a  rebellion, where  the  Pericu  Indians  burned  the  Mission  and  during  the  uprising,  Father  Nicolas  Tamaral  was murdered with great cruelty, The Jesuit Fathers left the Baja Peninsula in 1768.

In 1793 the Mission was destroyed by a storm and rebuilt in 1799.
From 1820’s to 1840’s due to wars and the poor conditions of the building the Mission was abandoned in 1840.

In  1932  the  actual  Mission  was  built across to  the  Plaza  Mijares,  being  served  by  Combodian Missionaries from 1948 – 1986. Actually the Mission of  San Jose has been in the Hands of Diocesan Clergy and attended by Father Juvencio Gonzalez.
English Mass: Sunday at 12 Noon
Phone: (624) 142-0064
Email: padrejuve@hotmail.com
From an old website: http://www.cabomission.com/

 

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Misión San Jose de Anuiti Church at night – 2014 – Photo © Joseph A Tyson

San José del Cabo Catholic Chruch • Misión de San José del Cabo Anuiti. Photo June 22, 2015

San José del Cabo Catholic Chruch • Misión de San José del Cabo Anuiti.
Photo June 22, 2015 • Joseph A. Tyson

Catholic Church in San Jose del Cabo, circa 1990's
Catholic Church in San Jose del Cabo, circa 1990’s. Photo by Bruce Herman.

Mission San José del Cabo. Photo by Fracisico Estrada • PhotoAmore.com
Mission San José del Cabo. Photo by Fracisico Estrada • PhotoAmore.com

Mission San José del Cabo was the southernmost of the Jesuit missions on the Baja California peninsula, located near the modern city of San José del Cabo in Baja California Sur, Mexico.The southern cape of the Baja California peninsula had been an often-visited landmark for Spanish navigators (as well as English privateers) for nearly two centuries when a mission was finally established at the Pericú settlement of Añuití in 1730 by Nicolá Tamaral. Initially located near the beach, the station was subsequently moved inland about 8 kilometers.In 1734 the Pericú Revolt broke out, Tamaral was killed, and the mission was destroyed. In 1735–1736, the reestablished outpost was moved back closer to the coast, but it served as a visita for Mission Santiago and as the site of a Spanish presidio. In 1753, San José del Cabo was again moved inland. In 1795, under the Dominicans, the surviving native population of Mission Santiago was transferred to San José del Cabo. The mission was finally closed in 1840.

Today this  is the most historical place to get married in Los Cabos with a Catholic ceremony.  Have a nice day,  Francisco Estrada
http://photoamore.photoshelter.com/

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Site of the San José del Cabo Mission (a light house later built on this site and destroyed) Photo by Marquis McDonald, 1949-1950  
http://libraries.ucsd.edu/speccoll/baja/mcdonald/m334-k50M.html

 

Site San José del Cabo Mission (Viejo) (Jesuit, 1730). "Virtually nothing remains at these two sites to indicate the size or shape of these buildings. Both were apparently of adobe, but even that would be difficult to ascertain."
Site San José del Cabo Mission (Viejo) (Jesuit, 1730). ”Virtually nothing remains at these two sites to indicate the size or shape of these buildings. Both were apparently of adobe, but even that would be difficult to ascertain.”  Photo by Marquis McDonald – 1949 – 1950.